Rough Green Snake (Opheodrys aestivus)

Synonym
  • Opheodrys aestivus (LINNAEUS, 1766)1
Approximate Size
  • Males 89cm (35in.)
  • Females 95cm (37in.)
Natural Distribution
  • Mexico,¬†Southeastern United States, from Florida, north to New Jersey, Indiana, and west to Central Texas. (Widely distributed)
Conservation Status
  • Least Concern2
Characteristics

Both males and females are small, slender snakes with dorsal and lateral coloration that is typically bright green. The underbelly, chin, and lateral scales range from yellowish green in color to pale cream in color. h an average of 26.7 g, males are from 9 to 27 g, with an average of 16.3 g. Average lengths are 947 mm in females and 892 mm iFemales range from 11 to 54 g in mass, with an average of 26.7 g, males are from 9 to 27 g, with an average of 16.3 g. Average lengths are 947 mm in females and 892 mm in males.Males and females are similar in color, although females tend to me be larger in mass and length3.

Neonate Rough Greens typically hatch a turquoise color, darkening slightly with age. Some particularly nice adults will retain much of their neonatal coloring as adults.

Their keeled scales and large green eyes makes them popular as display animals for hobbyists.

Description

Greens tend to prefer habitat with light brush, vines, and trees often at the forest edge or in open forests.

These small arboreal snakes are a real pleasure to work with, are highly intelligent and can prove very rewarding to work with as they will readily take prey from your fingertips once they become familiar with their environments. These are highly active colubrid snakes, moving throughout the day, therefore an appropriately sized arboreal cages suites.

The Rough Green Snake (Opheodrys aestivus)

References

  1. Opheodrys aestivus (LINNAEUS, 1766) – The Reptile Database (Accessed Online, 2017)
  2. Opheodrys aestivus (Greensnake, Rough Greensnake, Rough Green Snake) – The IUCN red List of Threatened Species
  3. Rough Green Snake РBy Kaelin Creange (Accessed Online, 2017)

Captive-bred Reptile Excellence